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JWST 1101 : Elementary Modern Hebrew I
Crosslisted as: NES 1101, NES 1101 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Intended for beginners. Provides a thorough grounding in reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking. Students who complete the course are able to function in basic situations in a Hebrew-speaking environment.
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JWST 1103 : Elementary Modern Hebrew III
Crosslisted as: NES 1103, NES 1103 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Sequel to NES 1101-NES 1102. Continued development of reading, writing, grammar, oral comprehension, and speaking skills.
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JWST 2501 : Kosher and Halal Food Regulations
Crosslisted as: FDSC 2500 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The course will provide an introduction to the kosher and halal food laws and their application to the American food industry with limited coverage and home practices. The distance-learning component examines these laws and how modern religious food supervision functions. Discussion sessions with multiple discussion leaders cover a variety of religious diversity topics within and beyond the Jewish and Muslim communities.
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JWST 2522 : Drinking in the Ages: Intoxicating Beverages in Near Eastern and World History
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2522, CLASS 2630, NES 2522 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the production and exchange of wine, beer, coffee and tea, and the social and ideological dynamics involved in their consumption. We start in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and end with tea and coffee in the Arab and Ottoman worlds. Archaeological and textual evidence will be used throughout to show the centrality of drinking in daily, ritual and political life.
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JWST 2577 : American Jewish Women and the Body of Tradition
Crosslisted as: NES 2577, RELST 2577 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
JWST 2644 : Introduction to Judaism
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2644, NES 2644, RELST 2644 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
In this course, students will survey the development of Judaism from its roots in ancient Mesopotamia to modernity. Rather than thinking of Judaism as static and easily definable, we will explore a history that is complex and dynamic. Over the three thousand year period that we will be studying, individuals and groups who identified themselves as Israelites or Jews developed a remarkable variety of beliefs and practices in conversation and in competition with other groups, including Christianity and Islam. We will examine trends and key moments of this process in order to understand how continuity and change, the construction of identity, and the competition for legitimacy have shaped our contemporary ideas about what Judaism is. We will approach this subject from a historical perspective, analyzing material evidence and reading texts from each period in translation, and from a religious studies perspective, carefully observing how the meaning of categories such as religion and Judaism change over time. A better understanding of these changes can help us better to appreciate difference and conflict both ancient and contemporary.
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JWST 2662 : Daily Life in the Biblical World
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2662, NES 2662, RELST 2662 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
JWST 2754 : Wondrous Literatures of the Near East
Crosslisted as: COML 2754, NES 2754 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This survey course (which also fulfills an NES major requirement) is a multidisciplinary introduction to Near Eastern civilization, exploring history, literature, religion, art and archeology, and other aspects of the Near East's rich and diverse heritage from earliest times to the present. In Fall 2016, the focus is on the wondrous literatures of the region. Together we will read and discuss such ancient works as the 'Epic of Gilgamesh' and 'The Song of Songs,' from such medieval works as the 'Travels' of Ibn Battuta, the 'Shahnameh' of Ferdowsi, and the poems of Yehuda Ha-Levi, and modern material from the Arabic, Armenian, Hebrew, Persian and Turkish literary traditions. All material is in English translation.
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JWST 2920 : Modern European Jewish History, 1789 - 1948
Crosslisted as: HIST 2910, NES 2620 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
JWST 3101 : Advanced Modern Hebrew I
Crosslisted as: NES 3101 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Successful completion of NES 3101 fulfills Option 1 language requirement. Advanced study of the Hebrew Language both orally and through the analysis of mostly unedited texts of social, political, and cultural relevance with less emphasis on the study of grammar. Students are introduced to articles published in Israeli newspapers, magazines, works by authors and movies. Students develop composition and advanced writing skills by studying language structure, idioms, and various registers of style.
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JWST 3108 : Israeli Culture Through Literature
Crosslisted as: NES 3108 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course is intended to continue the development of all aspects of the language. Emphasis on reading and discussion of Modern Literary works. Reading include adapted as well as authentic literary and Journalistic texts. Authors may include: Amos Oz, Savion Liebrechet, Yaakov Shabtai,  Etgar Keret, Deborah Baron, Meir Shavit.  Cultural Topics are presented in conjunction with the reading, movies and popular Television series. The instructor will be sensitive to individual needs.
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JWST 3625 : Ancient Iraq: Cities, Migrations, and Kings
Crosslisted as: NES 3625 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
JWST 4708 : Cosmopolitanism, Tolerance and Coexistence
Crosslisted as: COML 4521, COML 6521, NES 4708, NES 6708 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Alexandria, the Egyptian port city, has a long history of rich cultural interaction. In this course we will examine literary and artistic representations of modern Alexandria, which have played an important role in creating, disseminating and immortalizing the city as a cosmopolis. Readings and discussions will interrogate the relationship between the city's cosmopolitan character and its colonial history. We will read works by: E. M. Forster, Constantin Cavafy, Lawrence Durrell, Fausta Cialente, Edwar al-Kharrat, Ibrahim Abdel Meguid, André Aciman, and Harry Tsalas. We will also discuss Youssef Chahine's semi-autobiographical Alexandria films.
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JWST 4745 : Colonial Intersections: Jews and Native Americans
Crosslisted as: AMST 4740, ANTHR 4745, ANTHR 7745, JWST 7745, NES 4745, NES 7745 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The colonial expansion of Christian Europe continues to leave its mark on the world of the twenty-first century. Two of the peoples caught up in that colonial project, in very different ways, are Jews and Native Americans. Indeed, these two groups were often conflated in the colonial imagination, with Native Americans imagined as the "lost tribes," and missionary rhetorics first aimed at Jews (and Muslims) being adapted for Native Americans. This course looks at the differing structural positions of Jews (the "other within" Christian Europe) and Native Americans (the "other without"). It also considers these peoples' varying responses to colonialism, and their relations with each other, to ask how we can compare forms of difference while retaining the richness of their distinctive formations.  
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JWST 6780 : Persecution and the Art of Writing
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6780, COML 6661, GERST 6780, GOVT 6785 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Our title is derived from the political philosopher Leo Strauss, who provides our initial analytic, methodological, and theoretical model. But we extend it beyond Straussian ideological positions and we include Art unrestricted to Written philosophy and literature, as in painting, music, cinema, and Reason of State. Persecution (via censorship or heterodoxy) is understood as being both externally imposed and internalized. "The double rhetoric" or "esotericism," and hence "writing between the lines," has a millennial history dating back to archaic times in probably all known cultures. We focus on more recent manifestations across disciplines, periods, and places. Examples include Gramsci (Prison Notebooks), Hegel (as read by Left-Hegelians and by Marx), and Lessing (on the Free Masons), but also Nietzsche, Heidegger, Freud, Wittgenstein, and their legacies.
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JWST 7745 : Colonial Intersections: Jews and Native Americans
Crosslisted as: AMST 4740, ANTHR 4745, ANTHR 7745, JWST 4745, NES 4745, NES 7745 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The colonial expansion of Christian Europe continues to leave its mark on the world of the twenty-first century. Two of the peoples caught up in that colonial project, in very different ways, are Jews and Native Americans. Indeed, these two groups were often conflated in the colonial imagination, with Native Americans imagined as the "lost tribes," and missionary rhetorics first aimed at Jews (and Muslims) being adapted for Native Americans. This course looks at the differing structural positions of Jews (the "other within" Christian Europe) and Native Americans (the "other without"). It also considers these peoples' varying responses to colonialism, and their relations with each other, to ask how we can compare forms of difference while retaining the richness of their distinctive formations.  
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